Revolution 9

song

You say you want a revolution
Well, you know
We all want to change the world
You tell me that it's evolution
Well, you know
We all want to change the world
But when you talk about destruction
Don't you know that you can count me out
Don't you know it's going to be alright
Alright, alright

You say you want a real solution
Well, you know
We'd all love to see the plan
You ask me for a contribution
Well, you know
We're doing what we can
But if you want money for people with minds that hate
All I can tell you is brother you have to wait
Don't you know it's going to be alright
Alright, alright

You say you'll change the Constitution
Well, you know
We all want to change your head
You tell me it's the institution
Well, you know
You better free your mind instead
But if you carrying pictures of Chairman Mao
You ain't going to make it with me anyhow
Don't you know it's going to be alright
Alright, alright
Alright, alright...

Wikipedia
"Revolution"
Single by The Beatles
A-side "Hey Jude"
Released 26 August 1968
Format 45 rpm
Recorded 9–13 July 1968
Genre Hard rock
Length 3:21
Label Apple
Writer(s) Lennon–McCartney
Producer George Martin
The Beatles singles chronology
"Lady Madonna" / "The Inner Light"
(1968)
"Hey Jude" / "Revolution"
(1968)
"Get Back" / "Don't Let Me Down"
(1969)
"Revolution 1"
Song by the Beatles from the album The Beatles
Released 22 November 1968
Recorded 30 May – 21 June 1968
Genre Rock, blues rock
Length 4:17
Label Apple
Writer Lennon–McCartney
Producer George Martin
The Beatles track listing

"Revolution" is a song by the Beatles written by John Lennon and credited to Lennon–McCartney. They released two distinct arrangements of the song in 1968: a hard rock version as the B-side of the single "Hey Jude", and a slower version titled "Revolution 1" on the eponymous album The Beatles (commonly called the "White Album"). Although "Revolution" was released first, it was recorded several weeks after "Revolution 1" as a re-make specifically designed to be released as a single. A third connected piece written by Lennon is the experimental "Revolution 9", which evolved from an unused portion of "Revolution 1", and also appears on the White Album.

Inspired by political protests in early 1968, Lennon's lyrics expressed doubt about some of the tactics. When the single version was released in August, the political left viewed it as betraying their cause. The release of the album version in November indicated Lennon's uncertainty about destructive change, with the phrase "count me out" recorded differently as "count me out, in". In 1987, the song became the first Beatles recording to be licensed for a television commercial, which prompted a lawsuit from the surviving members of the group.

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Revolution 9 (White)

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